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Pete Matthews Jr
3nt.xyz
Publication Notes

Pete Matthews Jr

Under Construction!


3nt.xyz

Under Construction!


Publication Notes

Some of the material on this page originally appeared on the MIT/DL Bridge Club site, on the page http://web.mit.edu/mitdlbc/www/contrib.html.

This page (http://3nt.xyz/about.htm) is now the official home of this material. Look for updates here.

Media Codes

To describe attributes of the intended media, PDF documents are noted with these Media Codes:

Media Orientation Columns Size Description
P Portrait 1-2 8.5"W x 11"H US Letter, usually single column, best for printing and viewing on a moderate to large screen. Articles published before July 1, 2018 and most other bridge material is in this format.
L Landscape 2 11"W x 8.5"H US Letter, print using less paper for proofreading or making notes, or view on a large screen. This version is seldom provided on the site. With 2-up printing, format J covers most of the function of format L, so this format should seldom be used.
J Portrait 1 5.5"W x 8.5"H US Junior (Half Letter), best for large print on letter paper, printing a book or booklet on Junior size (or larger print on larger paper). Best viewing on small screen. Select the "Fit" option when printing from Acrobat Reader to enlarge print to fill Letter pages. Also see 2-up printing, below. All articles published after July 1, 2018 should be in this format.

Note: I invented these three codes for use on this page.

Formatting for Small Devices

In MS Word 2010, select the Page Layout tab.

Once these required settings have been established, they should not need to be changed:

  1. Click the little corner-arrow in the bottom right of the Page Setup section.
  2. Margins tab: Top, left, bottom, and right all 0.3". Gutter 0.
    For page numbers in the footer, set the bottom margin to 0.4".
  3. Paper tab: Height 8.5".
  4. Layout tab: Header 0.0", Footer 0.2".

Switch to Media Code L:

  1. Orientation: Landscape
  2. Size: Letter (8.5 x 11 in)
  3. Columns: Two
  4. References Tab - Table of Contents Section - Update Table - (select desired option) - OK.
  5. Also do the Index, if there is one.

Switch to Media Code J:

  1. Columns: One
  2. Click the little corner-arrow in the bottom right of the Page Setup section.
  3. Paper Tab - Width: 5.6" - OK. [This switches Orientation to Portrait.]
  4. References Tab - Table of Contents Section - Update Table - (select desired option) - OK.
  5. Also do the Index, if there is one.

Printing - Acrobat Reader Recommended

Large Printing for Media Code J:

  1. File - Save As - PDF (new file type).
  2. Open the PDF, and invoke the print dialog (Ctrl-P on Windows).
  3. Select Portrait orientation and the fit to page option.
    • If using Acrobat Reader, select the Fit button. If you do not see it, first select Size (maybe you last printed 2-up).
    • If using the Edge browser, select the Scale option of Fit to page (not actual size).

2-up Printing for Media Code J:

Caution: If you use Windows 10, the default for handling PDFs is the Edge browser, which cannot print 2-up. The current version of Acrobat Reader is available at https://get.adobe.com/reader/. Keep the box checked to install the Acrobat Reader Chrome Extension, if applicable. Definitely uncheck the boxes, so that the optional offers from McAfee do not get installed.

  1. File - Save As - PDF (new file type).
  2. Open the PDF using Acrobat Reader, and type Ctrl-P.
  3. Select 2-up printing: click the Multiple button, select 2 pages per sheet, and then Horizontal as illustrated:
Dell 3760-PS Multiple, 2 pages per sheet, print both sides

Book Info

Hey, I'm writing a book! I'm sticking special formatting info in this section.

On Jan 1, 2019, I changed the header and footer dimensions above, and noted using a bottom margin of 0.4" with a one-line footer.

Headings

Each chapter is a "Heading 1" and has a number preceding its name (16-point bold Arial). Usually, the first topic in the chapter begins without further ado.

Each topic is a "Heading 2" (14-point bold italic Arial). To assure nothing else lands in the Table of Contents, "Heading 3" is not used.

Each topic starts with the main points to be discussed (11-point Calibri). "Heading 6" (12-point bold Calibri) is usually the only heading type in this section, although some run-in headings may begin paragraphs. I'm reluctant to change the 11-point default in my copy of MS Word to make "Heading 6" 12-point. Accordingly, I need to set one heading to 12-point, and then right-click on Heading 6, and select Update Heading 6 to Match Selection I keep having to do this, so it might be per-file, per-inserted-file, or per-section.

Each topic contains Backstory and Alternative Methods sections; each is a "Heading 4" (14-point bold Calibri). Within each of these sections, paragraphs may begin with run-in headings (11-point bold Calibri). This secondary material does not merit larger headings.

Line Endings

As much as possible, I attempt to follow Richard Pavlicek's Bridge Writing Style Guide. This means spaces normally appear between card symbols, suit symbols, and bid levels. Unfortunately, in flowing text, this can cause something such as "2 S" to be split across a line ending. To avoid that, use Ctrl-Shift-Space to insert a Nonbreaking Space between the "2" and the "S" (or spade symbol). We can also find this with Insert > Symbol > More Symbols... > Special Characters > Nonbreaking Space. Similarly, use Ctrl-Shift-Dash to insert a non-breaking dash.

Section Breaks, Footers and Page Numbers

Each topic starts a new page. To obtain that effect, we use Page Layout > Breaks > (Section Breaks) Next Page (or occasionally, Odd Page).

Now things start to get sticky. The first section of the book includes the front matter that will not have footers or page numbers. However, those pages are invisibly numbered.

Make sure there are no footers, or footers are empty, in this section. Alternatively, do this on the very first page, and then number the front matter as described below.

To start numbering within the front matter, section break to the next odd page. Open up the footer for the first page to be numbered, which brings up the "Header & Footer Tools" (green tab). IMPORTANT: make sure "Link to Previous" is NOT highlighted (yellow). It must be gray, or anything we do here will affect the previous section.

We want the page number on the right of the page for odd pages, and on the left for even pages. Use Page Layout > Page Setup > Layout, and select both "Different odd and even" and "Different first page."

Insert > Page Number > Format Page Numbers, in the front matter, and set the Number Format to i, ii, iii. Continue page numbering from the previous section. However, do not number the very first page.

To start numbering the main body, section break to the next odd page. Open up the footer for the first page to be numbered, which brings up the "Header & Footer Tools" (green tab). IMPORTANT: make sure "Link to Previous" is NOT highlighted (yellow). It must be gray, or anything we do here will affect the previous section.

Page Number > Format Page Numbers... Set the Number Format to 1, 2, 3 and Start at 1.

On the first even page to be numbered: Insert > Page Number > Bottom of Page, and select the first footer, simple page number on the left. In the footer for the page, put 10 spaces after the page number, and follow it with the book title.

On the first odd page to be numbered: Insert > Page Number > Bottom of Page, and select the footer to put a simple page number on the right. In the footer for the page, put 10 spaces before the page number, and precede it with the section or chapter title.

On the footer for the footer on the first odd page for each subsequent section, position the cursor at the right of the previous topic title, which should be there, and backspace over it. Then type the new topic title.

To start the next topic, section break to the (odd) next page. On the footer for the first odd page in the topic, position the cursor at the right of the previous topic title, which should be there, and backspace over it. Then type the new topic title. IMPORTANT: make sure "Link to Previous" is NOT highlighted (yellow). It must be gray, or anything we do here will affect the previous section. However, we do want "Link to Previous" for the even page footer.

Note: A single-even-page topic won't get into a footer. If the topic expands to a second page, then that footer will need to be fixed. Also, if the title of the book is changed, the even page footer will need to be fixed in every section.

Formatting for Kindle

All the information above is about formatting for a PDF file, especially Media J, which should display acceptably on any small device, including a smartphone or a Kindle.

However, I may need to publish in Kindle format. That may wreak havoc on carefully formatted tables. Pagination control is out the window, for sure.

Worse is my use of the Cards font. A Kindle certainly does not have that. Even if it's possible to install it, it might not work as desired. (It's fine in a PDF that contains a copy of the whole font.)

The trick will be to write the whole book in a single Unicode font. The two fonts that I found on Windows 10 to include the required outline (white) heart and diamond symbols, in addition to the solid (black) space and club symbols are:

Arial Unicode MS — symbols slightly smaller; text bolder than Calibri
Cambria Math — symbols significantly smaller; serif
Yu Gothic — symbols slightly larger; text fainter than Calibri
Yu Gothic UI — symbols significantly larger; text sl. bolder than Calibri

Yu Gothic UI is a User Interface font that has been compressed so that it can seamlessly replace other such fonts. Arial Unicode MS looks like the best bet. If the symbols are slightly larger than the rest of the font, they may cause extra space between lines when used in a paragraph.

Anyhow, the point is to produce the entire book in the same font, including the suit symbols. The fonts above have the symbols we need at the prescribed locations:

U+2660 = black spade suit
U+2661 = white heart suit
U+2662 = white diamond suit
U+2663 = black club suit

In MS Word 2010, use Insert - Symbol - More Symbols, and scroll way down. You'll see the Unicode number from the chart above, for the correct symbol. Of course, once you have the correct symbol in the book, just copy it around. These symbols are acceptable, but inferior in appearance to the non-Unicode Cards font symbols.

Unfortunately, although most fonts are Unicode, most of those do not contain the required four symbols. Many contain the black spade and club symbols, but not the white heart and diamonds. (Many fonts do contain a white diamond at the wrong location; avoid those fonts.)

Using a single Unicode font should enable the document to display reasonably on the end user's Kindle — if the kindle has a Unicode font containing our symbols — and if the user selects that font. This is reportedly possible on all recent Kindles, with the Georgia font appropriate for a first try. The appearance of the symbols is wholly dependent on the Kindle font. It would be appropriate to a documented test in the front matter of the book.

More info is out on the web. I found the work of Tim C. Taylor to be helpful, for example, https://timctaylor.wordpress.com/2014/02/24/kindle-support-for-unicode-pt2-how-to-use-unicode.

For a while I had a Kindle, but I gave it to my daughter. I got it to read library books, for which it was kind of a PITA. I like that better on my new Pixel 3 smartphone.

Most photos © Karen C. Matthews. Unless specifically attributed otherwise, all other content © Pete Matthews Jr.